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A Salute to Our Contestants 



hen I was a teenager, I had a 
cousin who traveled the world 
shooting nature photographs. Cap- 
turing the essence of a particular 
place by re-creating famous scenes or 
landmarks decades later was her spe- 
cialty. She told me she often had to sit 
for hours on end, sometimes days 
even, waiting for the twilight to cast 
just the right shadow, or the clouds to 
cluster in similar position, or the 
leaves to come to full rest. Through- 
out the icy mornings of winter and 
the long, humid swells of late summer 
afternoons she sat and sat, waiting 
with tripod firmly planted and cam- 
era ready to roll. 

Since that time, I have met 
many talented photographers of var- 
ied training and interests. The serious 
ones had their own dark rooms and 
took great joy in developing their 
prints, manipulating the outcomes 
through a slight nuance of timing or a 
tweak of chemicals. Theirs was a ju- 
venile excitement, each time an 
image developed and a surprise re- 
vealed itself. 

I admired their passion and their 
persistence. I envied the childlike 
quality that they brought to their art. 
And although I did not become a 
professional photographer, I have 
tinkered with a camera over the years 
and I have tasted the allure of the art 
form, now made more accessible to 
all of us by developments in digital 
technology. 



Nature and wildlife photogra- 
phers — to my way of thinking — have 
it all. They combine the fine skills of 
their craft with the limitless possibili- 
ties of the outdoors canvas, with 
nothing but their imagination (and 
perhaps, budget) to constrain them. I 
am still envious of their talents and 
their incredible eye for beauty. 

Working on this particular issue 
of the magazine has therefore been a 
genuine treat for me. It reminds me 
that there is no shortage of energy or 
insight among the pool of artists who 
continue to tote their favorite photo 
equipment into the woods and mead- 
ows or along the streams and coast- 
lines of this fine state. Their gifts span 
many generations: from early school 
age to those in their retirement years. 
And their enthusiasm can be felt in 
the notes that accompany their en- 
tries. 

So it is with great pleasure that 
we present this issue to you, to ponder 
and to marvel, to learn from and to 
rejoice in. May you enjoy the adven- 
ture as you travel with us through the 
eyes of our winners. And congratula- 
tions to all who entered, whether 
your submission is featured within or 
not. From the entire magazine staff, 
thank you and thanks to our sponsors 
who make the contest possible! 




Editor 



Mission Statement 

To manage Virginia's wildlife and inland fish to maintain optimum populations of all species to serve the needs of the Commonwealth; 
To provide opportunity for all to enjoy wildlife, inland fish, boating and related outdoor recreation and to work diligently to safeguard the 
rights of the people to hunt, fish and harvest game as provided for in the Constitution of Virginia; To promote safety for persons and prop- 
erty in connection with boating, hunting and fishing; To provide educational outreach programs and materials that foster an awareness of 
and appreciation for Virginia's fish and wildlife resources, their habitats, and hunting, fishing, and boating opportunities. 

Dedicated to the Conservation of Virginia's Wildlife and Natural Resources 

VOLUME 70 NUMBER 3 



Commonwealth of Virginia 
Timothy M. Kaine, Governor 



HUNTING & FISHING 

LICENSE FEES 

Subsidized this publication 

Secretary of Natural Resources 

L. Preston Bryant, Jr. 

Department of Game and 
Inland Fisheries 

Bob Duncan 
Executive Director 



Members of the Board 

Ward Burton, Halifax 
Sherry Smith Crumley, Buchanan 
William T. Greer, Jr., Norfolk 
James W. Hazel, Oakton 
C. T. Hill, Midlothian 
Randy J. Kozuch, Alexandria 
John W. Montgomery, Jr., Sandston 
Mary Louisa Pollard, Irvington 
Richard E. Railey, Courtland 
Thomas A. Stroup, Fairfax 
Charles S. Yates, Cleveland 



Magazine Staff 

Sally Mills, Editor 

Lee Walker, Ron Messina, Julia Dixon, 

Contributing Editors 

Emily Pels, Art Director 

Carol Kushlak, Production Manager 



Color separations and printing by 
Progress Printing, Lynchburg, VA. 



Virginia Wildlife (ISSN 0042 6792) is published month 
ly by the Virginia Department of Game and Inlam 
Fisheries. Send all subscription orders and addres 
changes to Virginia Wildlife, P. O. Box 7477, Red Oak 
Iowa 51591-0477. Address all other communication 
concerning this publication to Virginia Wildlife, P. C 
Box 11104, 4010 West Broad Street, Richmond 
Virginia 23230-1104. Subscription rates are $12.95 fo 
one year, $23.95 for two years; $4.00 per each bacl 
issue, subject to availability. Out-of-country rate i 
$24.95 for one year and must be paid in U.S. funds 
No refunds for amounts less than $5.00. To sub 
scribe, call toll-free (800) 710-9369. Postmastei 
Please send all address changes to Virginia Wildlift 
P.O. Box 7477, Red Oak, Iowa 51591-0477. Postage fo 
periodicals paid at Richmond, Virginia and addition 
al entry offices. 

Copyright 2009 by the Virginia Department of Gam 
and Inland Fisheries. All rights reserved. 

The Department of Game and Inland Fisheries sha! 
afford to all persons an equal access to Departmen 
programs and facilities without regard to race, colo; 
religion, national origin, disability, sex, or age. If yoi 
believe that you have been discriminated against i) 
any program, activity or facility, please write tt 
Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries 
ATTN: Compliance Officer, (4010 West Broad Street 
P.O. Box 11104, Richmond, Virginia 23230-1104. 

"This publication is intended for general information 
al purposes only and every effort has been made t 
ensure its accuracy. The information contained herei) 
does not serve as a legal representation of li'-h an. 
wildlife laws or regulations. The Virginia Departmer 
of Game and Inland Fisheries does not assum 
responsibility for any change in dates, regulations, o 
information that may occur after publication." 




CONTENTS 




Front Cover: 
Grand Prize 

This year's winner 
of the coveted 
Grand Prize 
Cover goes to Joe 
Mikus of Win- 
chester, for his 
beautiful portrait 
of a young red 
fox. While sitting 
in a blind in 
Frederick County, 
Joe spotted the curious animal as it came 
close to investigate his blind and the 
sounds of his camera firing. This is the 
first year that Joe entered the contest, 
and wow, what a great cover! 
Congratulations Joe!!! 

Nikon D300 digital camera, Nikkor 
400mm f2.8 lens, 1.4x teleconverter, 
ISO 800, l/320th, f.5.6, flash. 
Back Cover: Grand Prize, see page 34. 



V\ 



KQINT \ 



Magazine 
Subscriptions 

For subscriptions, 

circulation problems 

and address changes 

call: 

1-800-710-9369 

12 issues for $12.95 
24 issues for $23.95 
36 issues for $29.95 






8 



12 



18 

21 
25 



28 



SCENIC SEASONS 



COLD AND CLAMMY 
CRITTERS 



THE SPORTING LIFE 



MARVELOUS 
MAMMALS 



A BUG'S LIFE 



BIRDS OF A FEATHER 



FANTASTIC FLOWERS 



KIDS AND CAMERAS 




www.kodak.com 



Virginia is for Lovers^ 



www.virgima.org 



% 



ichmond 

amera 



www.richmondcamera.com 



Annual 

Photography Contest 

Showcase 



' ' II hhhhh, dang. This is getting harder 
V/ every year!" Staring at the computer 
monitor, editor Sally Mills, art director Emily 
Pels, former editor Lee Walker, and I began to go 
through the 247 images submitted for A Bug's 
Life. "Good grief. ..there are so many good 
ones," someone murmured. As we carefully fin- 
ished reviewing all of the images on the screen, 
we took a communal breath and continued the 
tough editing process. Our first eliminations still 
left us with 55 photographs to fight over; oops, I 
mean discuss. And we still had seven more cate- 
gories to go through. 

This year, the number of photographers en- 
tering the contest and the number of entries was 
down slightly, but the quality was definitely up. 
We had nearly 200 photographers submit over 
1400 images, as opposed to last year's 1500 en- 
tries from over 300 participants. Categories that 
had not seen a lot of submissions, such as The 
Sporting Life, became very competitive this year 
with over 100 top quality entries. Birds of a 
Feather (over 300), A Bug's Life (247) and 
Fantastic Flowers (213) still remained the 
largest categories. 

It took us two hill days to judge the competi- 
tion, shaving time off of last year's competition, 
but that was because office manager Kim Crock- 
ett had diligently organized and recorded all sub- 
missions throughout the year. This made things 
very turn-key when it came time for judging. 

Whittling down the submissions, we dis- 
cussed various aspects of what makes a great 
photograph. Some pictures were beautifully exe- 
cuted in gorgeous light, using color well, appro- 
priate shutter speeds and depth-of-field, and 
great composition to create artistically stunning 



by Lynda Richardson 

results. Other photographs had the "wow" fac- 
tor of subject matter or technical expertise on 
their side: a hard to photograph behavior was 
captured; a rare or difficult subject was record- 
ed; an unusual angle or difficult technique was 
executed. But then, how do you judge artistic 
over "Wow?" That was when we would get into 
our annual "discussions" over the final selec- 
tion. There was a lot of give and take and, as al- 
ways, we did have to call in our tie-breaker 
Carol Kuslilak, our production manager. 

A few problems with entries still remained. 
Several photographers submitted poor quality, 
out-of-focus, overly saturated, or unnaturally 
colored prints without a digital file of the photo- 
graph that we could check for image quality. 
These images were automatically disqualified. 
Lastly, it appears that only a couple of people 
read my November 2007 "Photo Tips" column 
on ITPC information. Of all the digital photo- 
graphs submitted, only a handful of photogra- 
phers imbedded their name and contact infor- 
mation into their digital files. Not including ITPC 
information can be a real pain to editors! Hint, 
hint! (This will be another upcoming "Photo 
Tips" column, so stay Uined.) 

As you will note in the caption informa- 
tion, the winners displayed a great deal of effort 
and patience in their attempts to capture a win- 
ning photograph. For example, the Kid's Grand 
Prize Back Cover winner, 13-year-old Marlin 
Shank of Dayton, used remote camera gear and 
triggers to capture his awesome image of a fly- 
ing bam owl. First-place winner of A Sporting 
Life, Roddy Addington of Pound, traveled un- 
derground with his camera for an incredible 
35-second exposure of a large room in Wildcat 



Saltpeter Cave in Big Stone Gap. Jan Shook of 
Oak Hill dodged falling apples while holding a 
flashlight in one hand and a camera in the other 
to capture her second place of an opossum in 
an apple tree. I could go on and on. 

But of all the winners, the young red fox 
gracing our front cover and winning the Grand 
Prize for first-time entrant Joe Mikus of Win- 
chester says it all. Wildlife and nature photogra- 
phy is all about planning, patience, persistence, 
and luck. After hours of waiting in a blind for a 
totally different subject, Joe was surprised by 
the appearance of this beautiful fox. As the curi- 
ous animal came closer, Joe captured this de- 
lightful portrait, which speaks volumes about 
our relationship with the spirit of the natural 
world. To quote Martin Buber, "An animal's 
eyes have the power to speak a great language." 
So true. 

I would like to extend a special thank you 
to the loyal sponsors of the annual photography 
contest: the Eastman-Kodak Company, Rich- 
mond Camera, and of course, Virginia 
Wildlife. 

So, to all of you photographers out 
there. . .NOW is the best time to start planning 
and shooting for next year's competition! Soak 
in this fabulous issue and be inspired to connect 
with the Earth's beauty through the adventiire 
and challenges of photography. Enjoy! 



Please note changes on "How to Enter" 

the 2009 Annual Photography 

Contest. 

http:/Avww.dgtf.virginia.gov/evenLs/ 
photo-contest.pdf 



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VIRGINIA WILDLIFE ♦ www.HuntFishVA.com 





1 1 




FIRST PLACE 



Virginia Beach 

Traveling the back roads of Highland and Bath counties paid off 
for G. Michael Brown with a first-place win for his "Big Sky" fall 
landscape. Makes you want to travel on down that gravel road to 
see what awaits you. Great shot! 

Nikon D300 digital camera, Nikkor 17-35mm f.2.8 lens, ISO 320, 
l/200th, f.6.3. 



Charles Dickens 



"How glorious a greeting tfiesungives the mountains!" 

John Muir 




SECOND PLACE 
Rebecca Gregory 

Clear Brook 

Big Meadows in Shenandoah National 
Park is prime for great photographs. 
Becky captured this dramatic sunset 
one fall. 

Canon EOS 40D digital camera, Canon 
100-400mm f4.5-5.6 lens, ISO 1600, 
l/250th, f.29.0. 



HONORABLE 
MENTION 

Megan Freeborn 

Wirtz 

Fingers of ice reaching out in the cold, 
Rocky Mount. 

Nikon D50 digital camera, Nikkor 18- 
135mm f.3. 5-5.6 lens, ISO 200, 
l/250th, f.8.0. 



VIRGINIA WILDLIFE ♦ www.HuntFishVA.com 




THIRD PLACE 

Lori Atwater 

Blacksburg 

Cascades upper falls in Giles County. 

Canon PowerShot A700 digital cam- 
era, ISO no recorded, l/10th, f.8.0. 



HONORABLE 
MENTION 

Joyce Sims 

Radford 

A cold January at Mabry Mill. 

Olympus SP-550UZ digital camera, 
ISO 50, l/250th, f.3.7. 




MARCH 2009 



Cold 



and 



Critters 




FIRST PLACE 



Falmouth 

We all gasped when we saw this stunning photograph of a brook trout rising. The colorful 
fish and its harsh curvy shadow against a clean, sandy river bottom made this a first-place 
win for David Boyd. David got the shot in the Shenandoah National Park in a river near 
Natural Bridge. Wow! 

Canon EOS-lDs Mark III digital camera, Canon 100-400mm f4.5-5.6 lens, ISO 1600, l/500th, 
f.9.0. 




'"Photography is a small voice, at best, but 
sometimes one photograph, oragroup of 
them, can lure our sense of awareness." 

W. Eugene Smith 



SECOND PLACE 
Paul Block 

Williamsburg 

Green tree frogs huddle together 
for a snooze on a cattail along a 
small pond in Yorktown. 

Nikon D70 digital camera, Nikkor 
105mm micro lens, ISO not 
recorded, l/500th, f.8.0. 



MARCH 2009 



THIRD 
PLACE 

Rachel Echols 

Chester 

While photographing flowers 
at "The Wetlands" in the 
James River Park in Rich- 
mond, Rachel spotted this 
small northern water snake 
that remained motionless 
while she photographed it. 

NIKON D80 digital camera, 
Nikkor80-400mmf4.5-5.6 
lens with an additional 
Canon 500D close-up filter, 
ISO 500, l/25th, f.18.0. 




HONORABLE 
MENTION 

Sean M. Wender 

Richmond 

An eastern fence lizard is discov- 
ered basking on an old shed in 
Sussex County. 

Canon PowerShot SD600 digital 
camera, ISO not recorded, l/80th 
f.2.8. 



VIRGINIA WILDLIFE ♦ www HuntFishVA.com 



"Vdiqss a frog even if there was no promise of a 'Prince 
Charming popping out of it liovefrogs" 



Cameron Diaz 




HONORABLE 
MENTION 

Randy Streufert 

Mason Neck 

Green frogs rest in duckweed in a 
pond near Randy's house in Mason 
Neck. 

Nikon F-5 camera, Nikkor 200mm 
f.4.0 micro lens, ISO 100 Fuji slide 
film, l/60th, f.11.0. 




HONORABLE 
MENTION 
Kelly Cade 

West Point 

A diamondback terrapin was found 
trying to lay her eggs in Kelly's 
garden. 

Fuji Finepix S5100 digital camera, 
ISO 100, l/150th, f.2.9. 



MARCH 2009 









FIRST PLACE 



taf^a 



u make it 



Ansel Adams 



Pound 

This spectacular image of Wildcat Saltpeter Cave located in Big 
Stone Gap wins first place for Roddy Addington. A 25-year veter- 
an of spelunking (caving), Roddy reports that this photograph 
was taken with the help of fellow spelunkers who you can see in 
the photograph. It's hard to imagine, but this underground room 
is huge: 100 feet wide by 350 feet long, with a ceiling of 70 feet. 
Incredible! 

Nikon D100 digital camera, Nikkor 28mm lens, ISO 200, 35 sec- 
onds, f.4.0. 





SECOND 
PLACE 

Jeff Stower 

Fredericksburg 

While camping with his 
5-year-old son along the 
upper Rapidan River in 
the Rapidan Wildlife 
Management Area near 
Shenandoah National 
Park, an American toad 
hopped over to Jeff and 
his son's lantern and sat 
for about 20 minutes, 
catching bugs attracted 
to the light. Jeff said that 
it seemed as if the toad 
had done this before. 

Nikon D300 digital cam- 
era, Nikkor50mmf.l.8 
lens, ISO 400, l/15th, 
f.2.0 shot with available 
light. 



THIRD 
PLACE 

Eric Rutherford 

Abingdon 

A misty Washington 
County morning with 
some friends offers a 
chance to hunt the early 
goose season. 

Nikon D300 digital cam- 
era, Nikkor 16-85mm 
f.3.5-5.6VR lens, ISO 
200, l/160th, f.3.5. 



MARCH 2009 



HONORABLE 
MENTION 

Robert Forsyth 

Richmond 

Cast netting on the James 
River below Richmond. 

Nikon F-3 SLR film camera, 
Nikkor 180mm lens, Fuji 
Velvia ISO 100 slide film, 
l/500th, f.3.5. 



►► 




"One touch of nature maizes the wfwie world /qn." 

William Shakespeare 



HONORABLE 
MENTION 

Roddy Addington 

Pound 

Boating at the John Flanagan 
Dam in Haysi. 

Nikon D100 digital camera, 
Nikkor 70mm lens, ISO not 
recorded, l/250th, f.11.0. 





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14 



VIRGINIA WILDLIFE ♦ wvwv.HuntFishVA.com 



Marvel 



mmals 




FIRST PLACE 



Hampton 

In the fading light of the day, white-tailed bucks 
duke it out near the horse ties across the street 
from the wayside restaurant at Big Meadows in 
Shenandoah National Park. Dave captures first 
place with this intense moment between two 
beautiful animals battling for the rights to a 
nearby doe. Awesome! 

Canon EOS 20D digital camera, Canon 400mm 
f.5.6 lens, ISO 400, l/400th, f.6.3. 



Annie Leibovitz 



SECOND PLACE 
Jan Shook 

Oak Hill 

Holding a spotlight in one hand 
and her camera in the other, Jan 
dodged falling apples to capture 
this photograph of an opossum, 
the first one she'd ever seen. Jan 
photographed this great shot at 
her sister's farm in Ivor. 

Nikon D300 digital camera, Nikkor 
18-200mm f3.5-5.6 lens, ISO 360, 
l/60th, f.5.6. 




HONORABLE 
MENTION 

Mark Cox 

Fort Blackmore 

Taken during a spelunking trip to a 
cavern on Natural Tunnels property, 
this adorable wood rat (also known 
as a pack rat) curiously watched 
Mark from its nest. 

Nikon D60 digital camera, Nikkor 
55-200mm f4.0-6.0 G lens, ISO 
3200, l/60th, f.5.6, flash. 




16 



VIRGINIA WILDLIFE ♦ www.HuntFishVA.com 




"An animal's eyes have the power to speakji great language" 



Martin Buber 




THIRD PLACE 

Rebecca Gregory 

Clear Brook 

Sitting quietly in the grass helped 
Rebecca get this photograph of a 
white-tailed deer fawn at Big Mead- 
ows in Shenandoah National Park. 

Canon EOS 40D digital camera, 
Canon 100-400mm f.5.6 lens, 
ISO 400, l/200th, f.5.6. 



HONORABLE 
MENTION 
Ruth Dellinger 

Woodstock 

This black bear decided to sleep in 
a tree close to the road near Ruth's 
house. Ruth says that he seemed 
perfectly comfortable sleeping 
there as folks drove by and stopped 
for a look and took pictures. 

Olympus E500 digital camera, 70- 
300mm f.4.0-5.6 lens, ISO 400, 
1/1 60th, f.5.4. 



MARCH 2009 



17 



A 




Life 




FIRST PLACE 



Blacksburg 

Lori captures first place with this gorgeous photograph of an Io moth on 
daylilies in her front yard in Blacksburg. Good spotting! 

Canon PowerShot A700 digital camera, ISO not recorded, l/250th, f.4.0. 




SECOND 
PLACE 

Lori Atwater 

Blacksburg 

Grasshopper found at 
the Roanoke Street 
Community Garden in 
Blacksburg. 

Canon PowerShot 
A700 digital camera, 
set on auto/macro. 




THIRD 
PLACE 

Chris Wirth 

Powhatan 

Small black ants at- 
tempt to haulaway a 
much larger ant dying 
in Chris' backyard in 
Powhatan. 

Canon EOS 30D digital 
camera, Canon MP- 
E65mmf2.81-5x 
macro lens, ISO 250, 
l/250th, f.16.0, 
Canon MT-24EX Macro 
Twin Lite Flash with 
custom made diffuser. 



MARCH 2009 



HONORABLE 
MENTION 
Tony Coomer 

Dumfries 

Common green darners Locked 
in a pre-nuptial hold were 
photographed at Occoquan 
Bay National Wildlife Refuge. 

Canon EOS 20D digital cam- 
era, Canon 400mm f.5.6 lens, 
ISO 400, l/400th, f.7.1. 




<<c Ihe artist's zvortdis limitless. It can Se found anywhere, 
far from where he lives or a few feet away. It is always on 
his doorstep." 



Paul Strand 



HONORABLE 
MENTION 
Keith Somers 

Louisville, KY 

A curious praying mantis 
perches on the outside of a 
window. 

Olympus E-510 digital camera, 
ISO 100, l/80th, f.5.6, with 
flash. 




20 



VIRGINIA WILDLIFE ♦ www.HuntFishVA.com 



Bird 



ather 




FIRST PLACE 



Bumpass 

First place goes to Dave Dickerson for his spectacularly sharp photograph of a male osprey 
with what appears to be an Atlantic needlefish. Dave photographed this awesome moment 
at Kiptopeke State Park on the Eastern Shore. What a killer shot! 

Nikon D300 digital camera, Nikkor 400mm f2.8 AFS lens with 1.7x teleconverter, (950mm), 
ISO 200, l/1250th, f.6.3. 



21 




SECOND PLACE 
Jeffery Ruisi 

Richmond 

Canada geese fly through the fog above the James River 
at Pony Pasture Park in Richmond. 

Canon EOS 20D digital camera, Canon 100-400mm IS 
lens, ISO 100, l/30th, f.8.0. 



"If all the beasts weregone, man would die 
from a great loneliness of spirit for what- 
ever havens to the beasts, soon havens to 
man. All things are connected." 

Chief Seattle 



HONORABLE 
MENTION 

Kevin Shank, 

Dayton 

A very rare sight in Virginia, this male 
painted bunting made appearances to 
a bird feeder in Verona during 2007 
and 2008. Over 300 birders visited the 
bird during its December to April stay 
and Kevin was lucky enough to capture 
the unusual southern visitor in an icy 
environment. 

Canon EOS 40D digital camera, Canon 
400mm lens, 1.4xteleconverter, ISO 
500, l/1600th, f.4.5. 



22 



VIRGINIA WILDLIFE ♦ www HuntFishVA.com 





THIRD PLACE 

Joe Mikus 

Winchester 

Joe found this eastern screech 
owl resting in a tree in Frederick 
County. When processing the 
digital file, Joe decided to cre- 
ate a black and white image to 
bring out the beautiful textures. 

Nikon D200 digital camera, 
Nikkor 200-400mm lens, ISO 
400, l/125th, f.4.0, with flash. 



MARCH 2009 



23 





HONORABLE MENTION 
Joe Mikus 

Winchester 

A pileated woodpecker family at Sky Meadows 
State Park was photographed using a remote 
set-up 30 feet up in a tree and 15 feet from the 
nest. The camera was triggered with a shutter 
release from the ground. 

Nikon D3 digital camera, Nikkor 70-200mm 
f.2.8 lens, ISO 1100, l/250th, f.6.3. 



HONORABLE MENTION 
Lynda Blair 

New Kent 

Great egrets argue over a perch at Crewe's Channel 
off of Willis Road in Richmond. 

Canon EOS Mark III digital camera, Canon 400mm 
lens, 1.4xteleconverter, ISO 200, l/1000th, f.5.6. 



HONORABLE 
MENTION 
David Turtle 

Hampton 

A female northern harrier looking 
for prey, Big Meadows in Shenan- 
doah National Park. 

Canon EOS 20D digital camera, 
Canon 400mm f5.6 lens, ISO 400, 
l/2000th, f.8.0. 



24 




Fanta 



L 



wers 




FIRST PLACE 



Fairfax 

This gorgeous Deptford pink wins first place for Jeff Howell. Jeff reports that this 
photograph was taken early one morning near Lake Pelham in Culpeper. Beautiful! 

Nikon D300 digital camera, Nikkor 105mm f.2.8 micro lens, ISO 100, l/200th, f.6.3. 



25 



"Those who dwell among the 
beauties and mysteries of the 
earth are never alone or weary 
ojlije." 

Rachel Carson 



SECOND PLACE 
David Dickerson 

Bumpass 

Fern fronds were photographed on the 
Blue Ridge Parkway near Montebello. 

Nikon D300 digital camera, Nikkor 200mm 
f4.0 micro lens, ISO 200, l/8th, f.9.0. 



HONORABLE 
MENTION 

Rachel Echols 

Chester 

Allium, (wild garlic) photographed 
at Shirley Plantation in Charles City 
County. 

Nikon D80 digital camera, Nikkor 80- 
400mm f4.5-5.6VR, ISO 500, 
l/640th, f.8.0. 











26 



VIRGINIA WILDLIFE ♦ www.HuntFishVA.com 




"The poetry of the earth is never dead." 

John Keats 




THIRD PLACE 

Margriet Grant 

Warrenton 

An oak acorn rests on a wooden 
bench at C. M. Crockett Park in 
Warrenton. 

Nikon D80 digital camera, 
Nikkorl8-200mmIFED, f.3.5- 
5.6 lens, ISO 100, l/8th, f.5.6. 



HONORABLE 
MENTION 
Phillip Southard 

Orange 

This mushroom (Pholiotasp.) was 
photographed in Orange. 

Sony A300 digital camera, Sony 
18-70mm lens, ISO 100, l/40th, 
f.10.0. 



MARCH 2009 



27 



Kids & 








FIRST PLACE 



Glen Allen 

Nancy entered her first Virginia Wildlife photography competition 
at age 6, and won a second place. She has entered each year 
since then and has won something every time, except for first 
place. Now at age 9, Nancy captures her dream with this wonder- 
ful photograph of an American robin fledgling that she found on 
her swing set in her backyard. Way to go, Nancy! 

Canon EOS 20D digital camera, Canon 100-400mm f4.5-5.6 lens, 
ISO 200, l/50th, f.6.3. 



28 




"There are no seven wonders of 
the world in the eyes of a child 
There are seven million" 



WaltStreightiff 



SECOND PLACE 

Marissa Cowart, age 9 

Evington 

Marissa says she found these colorful 
mushrooms in her backyard, and as she 
photographed them she thought they 
looked like a big city. Cool; I think so 
too! 

Panasonic DMC-LS70, ISO 125, l/125th, 
f.2.8. 



MARCH 2009 



29 



THIRD PLACE 

Christopher Ryan Webster, 
age 12 

Madison Heights 

Christopher spotted this katydid rest- 
ing on a canna lily in his front yard 
one night. He really loves the con- 
trasting green of the insect against 
the pink of the flower. 

Kodak Easy Share digital camera, 38- 
380 (equivalent) AF lOx optical zoom 
lens on the night mode setting. 




HONORABLE 
MENTION 



►► 



Israel Gallagher, age 10 

Winchester 

This red-shouldered hawk was pho- 
tographed along a road in Boyce. 

Canon PowerShot SX100 IS digital cam- 
era, 6.60.0mm lens, automatic settings. 



30 




VIRGINIA WILDLIFE ♦ www.HuntFishVA.com 



Kids& 



1348 




Jlwugfi snail 
There: 
If I ou 
How come they Seat 



Allen Klein 



FIRST PLACE 



Richmond 

After several years of honorable mentions in this 
competition, Kayla finally wins first place with a 
favorite subject, the "lowly" garden snail. Kayla 
photographed this critter in Scott County. Con- 
gratulations, Kayla! 

Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT, Canon 100mm EFf2.8 
macro lens, ISO 800, l/15th, f.5.6. 




"The virtue of the camera is not thepozver it 
has to transform the photographer into an 
artist, but the impulse it gives him to keep 
on looking " 



Brooks Anderson 



± SECOND PLACE 
Dillon Rapalee, age 15 

Goochland 

Dillon reports that on the morn- 
ing of the Youth Turkey Hunt Day 
in May of 2007, it had snowed 
and was so beautiful outside that 
he wanted to take some pictures. 
He didn't get his turkey that day 
but did end up with some gor- 
geous shots, like this snow-cov- 
ered red bud. 

Nikon Coolpix P4 digital camera , 
ISO 50, l/420th, f.5.3. 



32 



VIRGINIA WILDLIFE ♦ www.HuntFishVA.com 





THIRD PLACE 
Rebecca Coordes, age 15 

Willis 

A praying mantis in the garden. 

FinePix S5700 digital camera, ISO 
200, 1/lOOth, f.3.5. 



HONORABLE 
MENTION 

Michael David Kyle, age 17 
Cedar Bluff 

A white-tailed deer fawn is discov- 
ered while trout fishing in Bland 
County. 

Kodak Easy Share 433 digital camera, 
ISO 80, l/90th, f.4.0. 



MARCH 2009 



33 



HONORABLE 
MENTION 



►► 



Dillon Rapalee, age 15 

Goochland 

This captures one spring day be- 
fore the rain, behind the High- 
land Historical Society museum in 
McDowell. 

Nikon Coolpix P4 digital camera, 
ISO 50, l/90th, f.3.1. 




Back Cover: 

GRAND PRIZE FOR KIDS 

Marlin Shank, age 13 

Dayton 



►► 



This year's winner of the Kid's Grand Prize Back Cover is 
Marlin Shank, age 13, of Dayton for his technically chal- 
lenging photograph of a barn owl leaving a barn in Rock- 
ingham County. Using two, slave driven Nikon SB 800 
flashes set up on either side of the window where the owl 
comes and goes, and a Phototrap electric eye positioned 
near the window, Marlin was able to photograph the owl 
as it flew in and out of the window. The owl triggered the 
Phototrap device as it flew by, and that caused the cam- 
era to fire. As the camera fired, its flash set off the Nikon 
flashes. Are you following me on this? Cool, eh? Hey, wait 
a second, I think the owl took his own picture! 

Fabulous job Marlin! All that hard work paid off, because 
look at this wonderful image gracing the back cover of Vir- 
ginia Wildlife*. 

Canon EOS 40D digital camera, ISO 400, l/250th. f.6.3. 




34 



VIRGINIA WILDLIFE ♦ www.HuntFishVA.com 



I I 



V 



It's time to enter your best photo- 
graphs and let Virginia Wildlife maga- 
zine showcase your images for thou- 
sands to see. Special prizes will be do- 
nated by Eastman Kodak, Richmond 
Camera and Virginia Wildlife and will be 
given to contest winners. And, two very 
talented contest winners will have their 
photographs featured on the cover 
(adult) and back cover (kid) as the 
Grand Prize. Winning entries will also be 
posted online, on our Web site. 

Categories 

1. Birds of a Feather 

2. Cold and Clammy Critters 
Reptiles, fish, and amphibians. 

3. A Bug's Life 

Insects (which include butterflies), spi- 
ders, or other creepy-crawlies. 

4. Fantastic Plants 

Flowers, trees, grasses and shrubs that are 
native to Virginia. No cultivated plants 
are accepted. 

5. Marvelous Mammab 

6. Scenic Seasons 
Highlight the four seasons. 

7. The Sporting Life 

Feature hunting, fishing, boating, hiking, 
camping, and wildlife watching. Please 
make sure that all activities are done in a 
SAFE manner (i.e., lifejackets, blaze or- 
ange, sight and hearing protection). 

8. Kids and Cameras 

Two age groups: 6-12 and 13-18. 
Enter any of the above categories. 



How to Enter: 

1. The contest is open to any photogra- 
pher, amateur or professional, except em- 
ployees of the Virginia Department of Game 
and Inland Fisheries. Contest-related usage 
rights must be available to Virginia Wildlife. 

2. Each photographer may enter up to 
three (3) digital images per category. Sub- 
missions will not be returned. 

3. All images submitted must have been 
taken in Virginia within the past five (5) 
years. Do not enter photographs of ani- 
mals or plants that are not native to Vir- 
ginia. 

4. All contest entries must be listed on a 
piece of paper or "Delivery Memo" with your 
name, address, and phone number. Each 
entry must be individually listed on this 
paper stating the category in which it is en- 
tered and any details on how and where the 
image was taken. If possible, please indicate 
camera type, make, model, lens, film, and 
settings used. 

5. Digital images: Set your camera at 
the highest resolution and send us the origi- 
naUPEG, TIFF or RAW file. One CD or DVD per 
category. Label each disk with your name, 
category, and phone number. No digital 
prints required. Submissions will not be re- 
turned. 

Digital images that are grainy or show 
pixilation cannot be accepted for judging. 
Do not submit images which have been digi- 
tally manipulated. Manipulation of exposure, 
cropping, and some color correction is ac- 
ceptable. It is not acceptable to remove or 
add features to an image. 



6. We prefer that all photographs taken 
be of wild animals or plants in the wild but 
will accept photographs of animals or plants 
taken under "controlled conditions" or in cap- 
tive situations. Shots of animals or plants in 
the wild are given preference over captive 
shots. Wild animals should not be captured 
for the sole purpose of photographs for this 
contest. If you do photograph captive or 
"controlled" animals this MUST be stated in 
the Delivery Memo. 

7. Submissions must be postmarked by 
5:00 p.m. November 2, 2009. Winning en- 
tries will appear in the March 2010 issue of 
this magazine. 

8. Mail your contest entries to: 2009 An- 
nual Photography Contest, c/o Virginia 
Wildlife Magazine, 4010 W. Broad St., P.O. Box 
11104, Richmond, VA 23230-1104. The couri- 
er address is: 2009 Annual Photography Con- 
test c/o Virginia Wildlife Magazine, 4010 W. 
Broad Street, Richmond, VA 23230. It is rec- 
ommended that you send your submission by 
certified, registered mail, or by a courier who 
uses a tracking number to locate lost pack- 
ages. 

9. Virginia Wildlife staff members and 
well-known wildlife/environmental photogra- 
pher Lynda Richardson will judge all entries. 
Contest judges will not be responsible for lost 
mail. 



The Virginia Wildlife Annual Photography 
Contest is offered as a way to bring greater 
appreciation to Virginia's wildlife and nat- 
ural resources. 



Entries for the 

2009 Virginia Wildlife Annual Photography Contest 

must be postmarked by 5:00 p.m. 

November 2, 2009. 



MARCH 2009 




35 



Magazine subscription-related calls only 1-800-7 1 0-9369 

Twelve issues for S 1 2.95! 

All other calls to (804) 367-1000 

Visit our Web site at www.dgif.virginia.gov 



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